My Dog Has Bad Breath!

What IS it with dog bad breath? It’s widespread enough that we use the term dog breath¬†as an insult, yet a sign of potentially serious disease that is too often overlooked. It’s offensive enough that it can make your nose hairs curl, yet frequently ignored for years before

FDA Dog Teeth Warning – No Bones About It!

One of the most common problems we see are broken dog teeth Р specifically slab fractures of the upper carnassials. These are the big teeth on the side of the mouth that dogs chew with in a scissor-like action. When they fracture the whole side of the tooth snaps off, resulting

Cat and Dog Teeth – How Often Should They Be Checked?

This varies from individual to individual. Factors affecting the development of dental disease include diet, chewing habits, the degree of dental care provided at home, genetics and the presence of other illnesses. If your pet will allow you to check its mouth, you can look at its tee

Dog Breath is Not Normal! Why Your Pets Breath is so Horrible

Bad dog breath is not normal! ‘Dog breath’ is usually due to infection in the mouth. Plaque bacteria produce foul smelling compounds including hydrogen sulfide (rotten egg gas). As the infection progresses, pockets of pus and dead tissue accumulate around the teeth. Trappe

Painful Dog Teeth? My Vet Says So But My Pet is Eating and Seems Comfortable

Many oral conditions such as periodontal disease and malocclusions (orthodontic problems) are chronic so pets adapt to the progressive discomfort, displaying few (if any) behavioural changes, until the pain becomes unbearable. Even with problems that cause acute pain (such as dental f

Dog Breath? Dog Drooling? Trouble Chewing? Signs to Look Out for if Your Pet Needs Dental Care

Signs that your pet might be in need of a dental care might include any combination of bad breath, reluctance or difficulty chewing, chewing on one side, drooling, decreased appetite, face rubbing or pawing, reluctance to be handled around the mouth,or swelling around the face. Inside

What Exactly are Feline Resorptive Lesions?

Feline resorptive lesions (otherwise known as feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions or neck lesions) are a very common cause of dental pain in our feline friends. In fact, studies have shown that once cats reach middle age, at least half of them will have one or more resorptive lesi

What to Do if You See a Broken Pet Tooth

Broken dog teeth (and cat teeth) should be assessed by your vet as soon as they are noticed. If the fracture is fairly small and does not expose the pulp (living tissue inside the tooth) there is a reasonable chance the tooth will survive. However, such teeth should be monitored close

What to Do with Persistent Baby (Deciduous) Teeth

Dogs and cats have two sets of teeth, just like humans. The deciduous (baby) teeth are replaced by the permanent (adult) teeth between about 3-6 months of age. Sometimes the deciduous teeth do not fall out, which can lead to overcrowding, increased susceptibility to periodontal diseas

What to Do if Your Pets Teeth are Discoloured

Discoloured teeth can occur for many reasons, and should be evaluated by your vet. Often it is due to tartar or stains on the tooth surface, which can be removed by professional cleaning under anaesthesia. When the actual tooth itself is discoloured, this is generally a sign that the